On a Mission: Marshallton Conservation Trust Looks to the Future by Preserving the Past

Updated: Oct 26



Earlier this year, our organization embarked on an important initiative to evaluate our existing communications platform to better understand if how we communicate, both visually and through our messaging, accurately reflects who the Marshallton Conservation Trust is and what we do. It is of the utmost importance to us that every touchpoint–from our logo to our website–reflects our core mission, ideals, and values so that we may better serve the Marshallton community.


Last week we officially unveiled our updated Marshallton Conservation Trust

logo, community banner, and website (those who braved the elements at the Marshalton Triathlon may have already caught a glimpse). While nothing has changed fundamentally, the new “look” of the Marshallton Conservation Trust infuses renewed energy into our purpose and vision for the future. The three pillars that have long served as the foundation for our organization–preserve the past, protect the present, and plan for the future–are now front and center as the overarching theme of our updated website. Our logo visually reflects the rich history of our Village while acknowledging the key role we play in connecting the past with future generations, cultivating our sense of place, and protecting our natural resources.


As we celebrate the 300th anniversary of the birth of our village namesake this month, we join our fellow Marshallton community members to pay homage to the many meaningful contributions of Humphry Marshall. Beyond his accomplished career as a botanist, scientist, and author, Humphry Marshall made an indelible mark as an active member of the Marshallton community. He planted the seed for the unique sense of place of this “working man’s village” that is still deeply rooted in the culture of its residents today.


Fast forward to 2022, and the Marshallton Conservation Trust is poised and ready to continue the work of preserving the Village so that it may largely remain a small, unique, historic community today and for future generations.